China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce
China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce China Barrow huge old map 1796 Baker Staunton India Australia scarce
$ 600.00

A general chart, on Mercator's projection, to shew the track of the Lion and Hindostan from England to the Gulph of Pekin in China, and of their return to England, with the daily statement of the barometer and thermometer as observed at noon: containing also the limits of the Chinese Empire, as extended by the conquests of the present Emperor Tchien-Lung.

(Eastern Hemisphere)

Issued 1796, London by George Nichol and Sir John Barrow for Staunton. Engraved by R. Baker. 

Uncommon oversized folio sheet late 18th century engraved map.

Printed on heavy paper, now with short closed splits along couple fold-lines or at sheet edge, creased top left corner, light spotting and offsetting in places. Map remains attractive, visually pleasing, worthy of display.

Scarce giant format 18th century in any condition.

Sheet measures c. 39 1/2" x 26 5/8".

Printed area measures c. 37" x 22 1/2".

Tooley's Dictionary of Mapmakers, v. 3, p. 320.

[V451-R15518]

From the Old World Auction website we present this excellent concise description:

The map shows the track of two ships, the Lion and Hindostan, on their routes from England to China and back. Each day's progress was recorded along the route with several notations to the dangers along the way. Much of the area in and around China is dense with notations on the land and its peoples. The map was drawn by John Barrow, who was the private secretary to Lord Macartney. He was later Secretary to the Admiralty and was a vice-president and founding member of the Royal Geographical Society.